2 заметки с тегом

Matilda

Встань и иди

И ещё одна штука про животных, на этот раз из «Матильды». Там грозная директриса раскрутила ученицу за косички и перебросила через забор, а Матильда объясняла подруге, почему родители в это не поверят:

Matilda said, ‘Never do anything by halves if you want to get away with it. Be outrageous. **Go the whole hog**. Make sure everything you do is so completely crazy it’s unbelievable.

No parent is going to believe this pigtail story, not in a million years. Mine wouldn’t. They’d call me a liar.’

Тут я вспомнила крадущегося вепря, а потом узнала, что идиома «go the whole hog» значит «идти до конца», потому что в восемнадцатом веке английский поэт Уильям Купер написал вот такое неполиткорректное стихотворение:

Thus says the Prophet of the Turk:
“Good Mussulman, abstain from pork.
There is a part in every swine
No friend or follower of mine
May taste, whate’er his inclination,
On pain of excommunication.”
Such Mohammed’s mysterious charge,
And thus he left the point at large.
Had he the sinful part expressed,
They might with safety eat the rest;
But for one piece they thought it hard
From the whole hog to be debarred,
And set their wit at work to find
What joint the Prophet had in mind.
Much controversy straight arose—
These chose the back, the belly those;
By some, ’tis confidently said,
He meant not to forbid the head;
While others at that doctrine rail,
And piously prefer the tail.
Thus, conscience freed from every clog,
Mohammedans eat up the hog.

Вокруг да около

После Золушки настала очередь сказки про Джека и бобовый стебель. Прочитала уже штук восемь детских книжек Даля, и там всё время кто-нибудь сходит с ума вот так:

’Oh mum!’ he gasped. ’Believe you me
’There’s something nasty up our tree!

’I saw him, mum! My gizzard froze! ’A Giant with a clever nose!’ ’//А clever nose//!’ his mother hissed. ’You must be going **round the twist**!’

’He smelled me out, I swear it, mum!
’He said he smelled an Englishman!’

Или так:

‘It makes me vomit,’ she went on, ‘to think that I am going to have to put up with a load of garbage like you in my school for the next six years.

I can see that I’m going to have to expel as many of you as possible as soon as possible to save myself from going **round the bend**.’

(У него все книжки такие добрые, да)

По контексту понятно, что «round the bend» или «round the twist» значит «слететь с катушек» или «выжить из ума», но непонятно, почему. Есть версия, что когда-то давно в Нью-Йорке была психушка, дорога к которой петляла по холмам, и чтобы туда попасть, нужно было буквально обогнуть кучу поворотов. И сами по себе «bend» и «twist» часто используются вместе с разумом: головоломное «bend a mind», поехавшее «twisted mind» или умопомрачительное «mind-bending», так любимое Бенедиктом.

А «my gizzard froze» переводится как-то так:

«Ой, мама... верь или не верь,
но наверху кошмарный Зверь,
я там чуть к стеблю не прирос,
такой у Зверя умный нос!»
«Как — умный нос? — дивится мать. —
Ты спятил, сын... Ни дать, ни взять!» —
«Он, мам, унюхал в вышине,
что кровь английская во мне!»

Вообще «gizzard» — это мускульный желудок у животных и птиц, и выглядит он незабываемо. А в переносном смысле это нутро, и даже не знаю, зачем его запоминать — похоже, слово встречается только в этой сказке. Вот так оно выглядит у Адама Гидвица:

And one by one, each giant-hero cut himself from gullet to gizzard, and an explosion of blood and guts and partially digested meat and porridge poured all over the floor of the hall. One by one, each giant collapsed into the blood and vomit. The floor was six, now eight, now ten inches deep with blood and guts and food. Each time a giant fell, the steaming, putrid pool rippled.

«Revolting Rhymes»? You can say that again.